datagott > wetenschap

skybuck2000 (08.05.2020, 18:36)
Maybe water can be used as memory of the future, google it and see if you can find what I am writing about :P

At least take note of it and if intrigued research it and you may develop "wet" electronics of the future, almost like human brain and nerve cells "wet" electronics ! LOL.

Electro Magnetic Fields could be stored inside water.

Perhaps Bacteria and Viruses also leave "traces" of electro magnetic fieldsinside water.

If somehow the same water could also be used to get rid of excessive heat, which is basically the radiation responsible for the storage of informationthen maybe that be ideal or maybe this would lead to information leakage or disappearing of information :P :)

Bye,
Skybuck.
Jos Bergervoet (09.05.2020, 09:27)
On 20/05/08 6:36 PM, skybuck2000 wrote:
> Maybe water can be used as memory of the future,


Yes, mercury and other liquids have also been used in memory devices:
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delay_line_memory#Mercury_delay_lines>

> google it and see if you can find what I am writing about :P


Well, I found it Skybuck! (You didn't expect that, did you?)

> At least take note of it and if intrigued research it and you may develop "wet" electronics of the future,


There isn't very much storage capacity in those devices, but you
know, as uncle Bill said: "640kB should be enough for everyone!"
skybuck2000 (13.05.2020, 21:25)
On Saturday, May 9, 2020 at 9:28:24 AM UTC+2, Jos Bergervoet wrote:
> On 20/05/08 6:36 PM, skybuck2000 wrote:
> Yes, mercury and other liquids have also been used in memory devices:
> <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Delay_line_memory#Mercury_delay_lines>
> know, as uncle Bill said: "640kB should be enough for everyone!"
> --
> Jos


Nice find Jos, but this isn't what I was referring to, but maybe you have found something interesting too, I think I have seen this before.

However what I was referring too involves "nobel prize winner".

So try again ! =D

Bye,
Skybuck =D
Jos Bergervoet (14.05.2020, 10:29)
On 20/05/14 3:01 AM, Rasta Robert wrote:
[..]
> esteemed prize for some legitimate scientific achievement.
> What makes the term special is the fact that you'd think Nobel laureates
> (of all people) would be the most resistant to crankery.


I think those accusations are often political. Those scientists have
usually just expressed an open mind, or stated the obvious fact that
there is no proof that certain strange claims are *not* true.
If in addition they have a dispute with *activists* for stating the
obvious fact that there's no proof that their doom scenario's actually
*are* true, they get smeared by the well-known activists' methods.

> ... On the contrary
> however, the Nobel "disease" underscores the fact that human beings
> simply aren't "immune" to falling for crank ideas


For your information, Rasta, true scientists do not care whether the
media call something "crank" but only whether it is proven or disproven
by observations.

> ... — accomplished
> scientists included."


That may depend on how exactly they became "accomplished", perhaps..
Soortgelijke onderwerpen